Ipsos Thinks

Perennials: the facts

In Italy, people think that 48% of the population are over 65, whereas the actual figure is less than half this, at 21%Only a third around the world say that they are looking forward to their old ageMost of us feel younger than we actually are, with the typical baby boomer feeling nine years younger than their actual age.By 2050, one in five people in the uk will live to be 100Over-50s in the UK are the top spenders in a number of categories, such as travel and tourism, food, clothing, household goods, and eating out.For those aged 55-64, old age doesn't start until you're 72.Three in ten (31%) of the british public would like to see more older people in advertisingThe biggest worry about old age globally is simply not having enough moneyNearly six in ten around the world believe that it is the responsibility of younger relatives to provide care as people age.Most of us (*£%) want to mix with people of different ages and generationsTelevision portrays only 1.5 percent of its characters as elderly, and most of them in minor roles.We massively underestimate how much we will need to save to have a reasonable income in retirement - the average guess is £124,000, but the actual figure needed is £315,000The Japanese givernment's robotic strategy expects that, by 2020, four in five care recipients would accept having some support provided by robotsThe proportion of people in the uk aged 70-74 in employment has almost doubled in the past 10 years.In the US, Two in five (40%) of those aged between 65 and 80 are sexually active, but half of over-65s in the UK feel they are not having enough sexOnly three in ten globally think that people in later life have too much influence politicallyJ walter Thompson claim that four in five women over 50 won't make a purchase without checking on amazon firstGlobally, just over half (55%) of us believe that technological development has the capacity to improve old age for a lot of people

i. https://perils.ipsos.com/
ii. Ipsos Global Advisor, 20,788 adults aged 16-64 across 30 countries online, 24 August – 7 September 2018
iii. English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, Ch 11 Perceptions of Ageing http://www.elsa-project.ac.uk/uploads/elsa/report06/ch11.pdf
iv. https://www.ageuk.org.uk/globalassets/age-uk/documents/reports-and-publications/later_life_uk_factsheet.pdf
v. J Walter Thompson Intelligence, The Elastic Generation – The Female Edit (2018). Available at: https://www.jwtintelligence.com/2018/01/new-trend-report-elastic-generation-female-edit/
vi. Ipsos Global Advisor, 18,262 adults aged 16-64 in 30 countries, online, 24 August to 7 September 2018
vii. Nicola Kemp, ‘Why ageism is adland’s next frontier’, Campaignlive (2016).
viii. Ipsos Global Advisor, 20,788 adults aged 16-64 across 30 countries online, 24 August – 7 September 2018
ix. Ipsos Global Advisor, 18,262 adults aged 16-64 across 29 countries online, 24 August – 7 September 2018
x. https://www.ageofnoretirement.org/uploads/1c1588b37c4d55916468495ef1f648d3.pdf
xi. L.A. Zebrowitz & J.M. Montepare (2000). “Too young, too old”: Stigmatizing adolescents and elders. In T. F. Heatherton, R. E. Kleck, M. R. Hebl, & J. G. Hull (Eds.), The social psychology of stigma (pp. 334-373). New York, NY, US: Guilford Press
xii. ‘On the Money: Misperceptions and Personal Finance’, Ipsos MORI (July 2015)
xiii. Tarantola, ‘Robot Caregivers are Saving the Elderly from Lives of Loneliness’
xiv. An Ageing workforce’, Houses of Parliament; Parliamentary Offices of Science and Technology, October 2011
xv. https://www.prb.org/aging-unitedstates-fact-sheet/
xvi. Ipsos Global Advisor, 18,262 adults aged 16-64 across 29 countries online, 24 August – 7 September 2018
xvii. J Walter Thompson Intelligence, The Elastic Generation – The Female Edit (2018). Available at: https://www.jwtintelligence.com/2018/01/new-trend-report-elastic-generation-female-edit/
xviii. Ipsos Global Advisor, 18,262 adults aged 16-64 across 29 countries online, 24 August – 7 September 2018

The Perennials: The Future of Ageing

This report looks at our ageing societies and their challenges and opportunities. The media have obsessed about ‘Millennials’ as disruptors, but in fact ageing – which will affect every generation – is having even larger effects. Rising life expectancy and falling birth rates mean populations around the world are getting older. It is portrayed as a ’narrative of decline’ – not a time of opportunity and change.